What’s wrong with this picture?


Another case of the virtual triumphing over real-life. “Educational video gaming” could be coming to a classroom near you.

According to Bristol University neuroscientist, Paul Howard-Jones”, it’s all about dopamine. “Educational video games” have been proven to stimulate the production of dopamine in the brain. Dopamine increases attention spans and encourages the creation of new connections of synapses- which is the basis for all physical learning. Source

Additionally, video games apparently encourage students to be “active in manipulating objects and variables, have increased control over their actions, and engage in experiential learning”. Source

We already covered this a couple of weeks ago, but for those of you who may have missed our post “Feed the mind with exercise” , physical activity is directly linked to improved academic performance. Increased blood flow to the brain releases amazing “feel-good” endorphins which lifts levels of serotonin and dopamine in the body which are then directed to thr brain. Source 

It seems to me that a lot of the advantages of educational gaming promoted in this picture- such as teamwork, communication, negotiation and problem solving- can be taught just as efficiently in the playground with the obvious added benefit of the children being physically active.

Am I right? Why should schools be wasting valuable curriculum space and much needed funding on “educational video gaming”, when many of the associated benefits can be achieved with just half an hour spent in the play ground?

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2 thoughts on “What’s wrong with this picture?

  1. This is what we are trying to prevent- kids obsessed with technology, without fresh air and activity they will become a generation of robotic couch potatoes! Get them out of the classroom for a few hours a week and teach them sport that they can use for the future. Where are our next generation AFL or tennis players coming from if they don’t have the foundations to learn! This is such an amazing campaign!

  2. This blog really stood out for me because it is about an issue which our group is trying to show as a positive idea- that gaming is beneficial for kids and can help their understanding. I believe that it is about moderation and a healthy mix of both physical activity and educational gaming can fully maximise brain growth and development potential.

    However, the problem as I see it is that we are not reinforcing the same ethics that most of us grew up with and thus the future generations are becoming more lazy and self absorbed; obesity is on the rise and we may need to tone down the amount of time children spend in schools sitting at tables to provide a more balanced educational experience. ^RS

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